Saturday, 2 April 2016

The Tale of the Long Spoons

At my son's wedding, the grandfathers were given the opportunity to share a "blessing" to the bride and groom following the service. Little did my Dad know that the whole theme of their wedding would be one of "serving one another," and would include such elements as the literal washing of each other's feet, which left a very powerful and wet-eyed image to most, if not all, of the wedding guests. So when Dad came up front and included this story, well, it fit the overall theme of the wedding like a glove. Here's the story he told:

A Rabbi once asked God to be able to see heaven and hell. God permitted it and gave him the prophet Elijah as a guide. First, Elijah led the Rabbi into a large room. In the midst of it, on a fire, there was a pot full of delicious food. Round about people were sitting with long spoons which they dipped into the pot. However, the people looked pale, thin and miserable. The handles of the spoons were much too long, so that they could not bring the wonderful food to their mouths. 
When the two visitors were outside again, the Rabbi asked the prophet what strange place that was. It was hell. 
Then Elijah led the Rabbi into a second room that looked exactly like the first one. In the middle of the room was a fire and delicious food was cooking. People sat about holding long spoons. However, these people looked well nourished, healthy and happy. They did not try to feed themselves, but rather they used the long spoons to feed one another. This room was heaven.

Yes, there are a few theological liberties concerning heaven and hell in that tale, but I love that story nonetheless. I'd heard Dad's story several times before, but every time I hear it, it leaves me with the image of Jesus' call to each of us as to how we are to care for our fellow man. He, who fed the 5000 men (plus women and children) in John chapter 6, and fed the 4000 (Matthew chapter 15), through those feedings illustrated the importance of one-anothering and of giving the other a higher priority than ourselves. How well are we doing in that department? I wonder.

Perhaps this side of eternity there is also some measure of heaven and hell, and it's largely predetermined by the way we respond to the needs of one another. After all, as John said, "If anyone says, 'I love God,' yet hates his brother, he is a liar. For anyone who does not love his brother, whom he has seen, cannot love God, whom he has not seen. And he has given us this command: Whoever loves God must also love his brother." (1 John 4: 20-21; NIV).

Recently someone shared the following video on Facebook, which instantly made me think of Dad's story. At the very least, it's something for all of us to think about. Peace and Blessings.



Photo Credit: Dino Abatzidis; Flickr Creative Commons
Story Source: Translated by Gunter Rochow from: Both, Beate. "Die Geschichte von den langen Löffeln". Wenn wir anfingen mit dem Herzen zu denken. Wuppertal: Kiefer Verlag, 1986, 2. Auflage, p.38.

No comments:

Post a Comment